Training Tomorrow’s Scientists through Inventive Initiatives The South Side of Chicago faces some big challenges­ — including being hit hard by cancer. One way that the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center is addressing this challenge is by inspiring Chicago youth, especially those from population groups underrepresented in the biomedical sciences, to pursue careers in cancer research and medicine. The Comprehensive Cancer Center was recently awarded a $1.9 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to launch the Chicago EYES (Educators and Youth Enjoy Science) on Cancer program. Key new com­ ponents of the program include a partnership with the Museum of Science and Industry Chicago and the addition of teachers as program participants who will develop curriculum for their classrooms based on their research experience. “We believe it’s important for our Cancer Center, located on the South Side, to impact our surrounding community and reach students who might not have an opportunity to learn about cancer research, medicine and biologi- cal sciences,” said Eileen Dolan, “We believe it’s important for our Cancer Center, located on the South Side, to impact our surrounding community and reach students who might not have an opportunity to learn about cancer research, medicine and biological sciences.” — Eileen Dolan, PhD Undergraduate Kelly Perez conducted research in a chemistry laboratory over the summer. 24 Powered by Innovation